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  • AC Won't Turn On | The Complete Guide to Air Conditioning + How to Make Sure it Works Efficiently

    It happens to everyone; the AC won't turn on, or the air conditioning system stops working on the hottest summer day. Fortunately, there are things you can do to prevent that from happening. Nonetheless, if you are reading this guide, it probably happened to you. This guide covers possible reasons why your air conditioning system isn't turning on or isn’t working properly and includes tips on how to fix and prevent these problems in the future. We also discuss signs to look out for to help catch and avoid future air conditioning failures. Jump to a section: Signs of a forthcoming air conditioning failure Deep dive into air conditioning problems Conclusion Signs of a forthcoming air conditioning failure Table of contents for this section: AC Safety switch (float) keeps filling with water The air conditioner makes a loud buzzing noise when starting Air from the HVAC grille (vent) exits at a high velocity and is noisy AC is blowing warm air The AC turns on and off frequently The AC won’t turn off and runs continuously The thermostat keeps turning off and on or isn’t working right AC Safety switch (float) keeps filling with water If the AC safety switch (float) keeps filling with water, it is a sign that the system isn’t draining properly. Air conditioning systems generate condensation as they operate. Sometimes this condensation happens in the wrong places or does not drain properly. Both can cause damage to the HVAC system or water damage in the home. Too much condensation or condensation in the wrong place can indicate refrigerant, drainage, ducting problems, or restricted indoor or outdoor coils. It can also be because of dirty filters. Any signs of excess water can also indicate that the indoor coil is freezing. If you recognize any signs of water or your AC won’t turn on or stops working, we recommend consulting with an HVAC professional to diagnose the issue properly. The air conditioner makes a loud buzzing noise when starting If your air conditioner won’t turn on or the AC unit makes a loud buzzing noise when starting, it is a sign of a faulty AC capacitor. In other cases, it can be a sign the AC unit is working hard, which causes strain on the motors. The strain on the motors will cause them to make noise and fail sooner. The two biggest motors of the HVAC system are the indoor blower motor which moves the air throughout the system, and the compressor motor, which compresses the refrigerant in the refrigeration process. When the outside ac unit makes a loud noise when starting, there is a good chance the compressor's capacitor is failing, and if the indoor AC unit is making a loud buzzing noise when starting, there is a good chance the blower wheel motor capacitor is failing. Although capacitors fail over time, other underlying issues can cause capacitor or motor failures. Dirty air filters, ducting problems, refrigerant problems, and indoor and outdoor coil restrictions can all cause strain on the HVAC system motors causing them to fail sooner. Air from the HVAC grille (vent) exits at a high velocity and is noisy Some HVAC systems have high-velocity HVAC ducting and grilles by design. However, in most residential and commercial applications, air flowing at a high velocity indicates high static pressure. Often times this also causes the system to be noisy. Both noise and high velocity can be irritating and cause discomfort. High static pressure results from too many air restrictions within the air conditioning system and can be caused by ducting problems, improper system sizing, a restricted indoor coil, dirty filters, or too many closed grilles (vents). AC is blowing warm air If the AC in the home is blowing warm air, it can indicate that the refrigeration cycle isn’t happening properly and can be a reason why your AC won’t turn on. It is important to understand the underlying to why an AC is blowing hot air. The most common reasons the refrigeration cycle won’t work properly are a thermostat or electronic failure, dirty air filters, refrigerant problems, indoor or outdoor coil restrictions, faulty AC capacitors, drainage problems, a faulty compressor motor, or ducting problems. The AC turns on and off frequently An AC system that turns on and off frequently is prone to fail sooner. The energy and strain on the motors are greater when the AC cycles on and off every few minutes rather than when it cycles correctly. There are several reasons why an air conditioner keeps kicking on and off. When the compressor turns on and off frequently, it can indicate a few common AC problems such as drainage, thermostat, or refrigerant problems, an improperly sized system, indoor or outdoor coil restrictions, or a restricted air filter. Each system is unique, and the nature of each problem can cause the air conditioner to keep kicking on and off in a unique way. For example, in some cases, the AC system will cycle on and off every 10 minutes, and in other cases, it can start and stop after a few seconds. You can read more about the various reasons in the links above. The AC won’t turn off and runs continuously Some AC systems can run continuously. For Example, a high-efficiency variable speed system is designed to run all the time with the ability to adjust its cooling capacity. This in-depth guide lets you learn more about the types of HVAC systems. However, in most cases, that is not the case, and if the AC won’t turn off, it is a sign that something is wrong with the AC system. Standard AC systems that run continuously can have other underlying problems that cause the thermostat not to reach its set temperature. If that is the case, it can mean the HVAC system is improperly sized, the thermostat is faulty, the indoor or outdoor coils have restrictions, or there are ducting or refrigerant problems. In some cases, just the AC blower fan won’t turn off, which can be a sign of any of the above issues. In other cases, when it is 100 degrees outside, and the system runs continuously, it can indicate an undersized HVAC system. As a rule of thumb, the higher the cooling capacity, the faster the AC system can cool a space. Although it is important to keep in mind that a system that is oversized is also not ideal because it will cycle frequently. You can learn more about this and HVAC system design here. The thermostat keeps turning off and on or isn’t working right A faulty thermostat can also be a reason the AC won’t turn on or isn’t working properly. The thermostat may be turning off and on, not turning off at the set temperature, keeps turning off, the display may not be working, and the screen goes blank, or it is not getting power at all. There are many reasons that may cause any of the above symptoms in a thermostat. In many cases, it is a simple fix, such as a disconnected wire or replacing the thermostat. And in other cases, it can indicate problems with the drainage of the AC system. Deep dive into air conditioning problems Table of contents for this section: Dirty or restricted air filters and air restrictions Frozen coils on AC (Refrigerant problems) There is no power to the thermostat Restricted or frozen indoor AC coils Restricted outdoor coils Showing symptoms of a bad expansion valve Faulty motors Signs and symptoms of a bad AC capacitor Electronic problems Drainage problems Air conditioner safety switches Ducting problems Oversized or Undersized AC System Dirty or restricted air filters and air restrictions Dirty filters block the airflow within the HVAC system and throughout the home, causing air restrictions within the air conditioning system. Restricted airflow can cause many problems with the air conditioning system due to high static pressure. An air restriction caused by a dirty filter can cause an indoor coil to freeze. The indoor air conditioning coil freezes because the air conditioning system needs airflow to work correctly. You can learn more about how an air conditioning system works, but in short, the refrigerant temperature in the coil gets below freezing temperatures. When the humidity in the air makes contact with the coils, it condensates and freezes. A dirty air filter restricts the warm ambient airflow, which helps prevent the coil from freezing. If the coil is restricted completely, this can prohibit any airflow through the coil. This prevents the liquid refrigerant from “evaporating” in the evaporator coil and, as a result, can cause liquid refrigerant to make its way back to the compressor and damage it. In addition to freezing the indoor AC coil, a dirty filter can cause the blower wheel fan motor to die. The restriction in the air filter results in more strain on the motor as it forces air through the HVAC system. Replacing an air filter is easy and should be done as part of your air conditioning maintenance. You can connect with an HVAC pro or do it yourself. You may wonder why your air filters get dirty quickly and how often you should replace them. As a rule of thumb, 1-inch filters should be replaced every 1-3 months, and 5-inch filters should be replaced about every 6-12 months. However, this greatly depends on how often the HVAC system works and the home conditions. Frozen coils on AC (Refrigerant problems) It is not uncommon that an AC unit will freeze in the summer. In fact, the summer is when the AC unit is on and will usually freeze. If the type of system you have is a heat pump, it is also possible for the system to freeze in the winter. What causes an AC to freeze is typically a refrigerant or airflow problem. There are two common refrigerant problems, too much refrigerant or too little refrigerant. Both are not good and can cause your air conditioning system not to work correctly. When an air conditioning system is too low on refrigerant, it can cause the AC coils to freeze or not cool the home at all. Frozen AC coils can also be referred to as a frozen AC lines. When the refrigerant pressure is low, it is also a sign that there may be a refrigerant leak in the system. When an air conditioning system has too much refrigerant, it can cause the system not to cool properly and even cause a refrigerant leak because of high pressures. You can learn more about how the refrigeration cycle in an air conditioning system works, but in short, refrigeration is about heat transfer and pressure changes. Think of an aerosol spray that gets cold as you use it. A fast pressure drop happens, and the substance (refrigerant) inside gets cold. The same concept applies to refrigeration in a closed system. If the pressure is high, the refrigerant won't be as cold, and it can cause a leak because the high pressure exceeds the system design. If the pressure is too low, it can cause the system to freeze because of the low temperatures and moisture build-up on the coils. If there is a significant leak, the refrigerant will escape entirely, and the system won't provide cooling at all. Always contact an HVAC pro in the event of refrigerant problems. Refrigeration is a science; many factors, such as airflow and outdoor temperatures, contribute to proper refrigeration within an HVAC system. And because refrigerants contribute to global warming and ozone depletion, they must be handled by an EPA-licensed professional. Click here to learn more about frozen AC coils. There is no power to the thermostat The thermostat is what we see and think about when it comes to HVAC. It is what tells the system to go on or off. Fortunately, nowadays, thermostats don't have many moving parts. However, there are some rare cases where an HVAC thermostat has no power or doesn’t work. For example, it may not have power, or it may be flashing or blinking when the heat or cooling mode is on. A thermostat may have faulty temperature sensors or incorrect wiring, or the thermostat may have gone out due to electrical shorting, surges, or other internal issues. And other times, the thermostat works; however, some of the settings may be confusing, which can lead one to believe that something is wrong with the thermostat. If you suspect the thermostat isn’t working or has power, ensure that it is wired securely, or try resetting it. Just be careful because the electrical lines are live 24 volts. If everything seems wired correctly, it could be a drainage problem causing the HVAC system to disconnect power to the system via the “safe-t-switch.” If that is the case, you should connect with an HVAC pro to diagnose the source of the problem. Restricted or frozen indoor AC coils The AC’s indoor (evaporator) coil can get restricted from dirt, dust, and debris, microbial growth, or the evaporator coil can freeze up. A restricted or frozen AC coil is not good for your HVAC system or indoor air quality. When the indoor AC coil is restricted, it limits air flowing through it. This airflow restriction raises the static pressure and negatively affects the system's performance. It can also cause the air conditioning system to not work by damaging the blower wheel or compressor motor. You can learn more about the negative effects of high static pressure on an HVAC system, but to give you an idea of the concept, imagine blowing into a straw with no restriction, now imagine blowing into the straw again; however, this time close of the end of it a bit. The second time your lungs will work much harder to force the air out of the straw. The same concept applies to the air conditioning system. That means when the static pressure is higher, the blower wheel fan motor needs to work harder, increasing strain and energy consumption. The airflow restriction can damage the compressor because it will not allow the refrigeration process to happen correctly. You can learn more about how the refrigeration cycle works within an air conditioning system. But in short, the warm ambient air flowing through the indoor (evaporator) coil evaporates the liquid refrigerant to a gas. An airflow restriction can prohibit the refrigerant from entirely evaporating into a gas. And because liquid cannot compress, any liquid refrigerant that makes its way to the compressor will damage it. Microbial growth on an indoor coil will not only cause restriction in the system but will also taint indoor air quality. Although there is an air restriction, some air can still flow around the coils and into the home. That air can pick up microbial organisms and negatively impact indoor air quality. Most newer air conditioning systems have safety switches to prevent severe damage to the air conditioning system due to restricted coils. However, when the indoor coil gets restricted, it is a sign of other underlining issues such as restrictive filtration, expansion valve problems, ducting problems, or refrigerant issues. If your AC evaporator coil is freezing up or you suspect you have a restricted AC coil, an HVAC pro can diagnose and fix the problem. Restricted outdoor coils Restriction can occur in the outdoor (condenser) coil from dirt, dust, debris, or obstructions around the system. When the outdoor coil is restricted, it prohibits the refrigeration process from working correctly and can negatively affect the system's performance. You can learn more about the refrigeration cycle within an air conditioning system. But in short, the outdoor (condenser) coil condenses the refrigerant from a gas state to a liquid form. It does so with the help of coils and a fan. After the refrigerant exits the compressor into the outdoor (condenser) coil, it is a high-temperature gas. The ambient air from outside cools and condenses the gas refrigerant into a liquid refrigerant as it flows through the coil. If the outdoor coil is dirty or restricted, the outdoor air won't be able to flow freely through the coils, which prevents the refrigerant from being able to condensate properly in the refrigeration cycle. This can prevent the refrigerant from having a good pressure and temperature drop when it enters the evaporator coil. Resulting in warmer temperatures blowing from the AC. Additionally, the high pressures will cause the HVAC system to consume more energy. The fan motor will need to work harder to pull air through the coils, and the compressor motor will work harder because the refrigerant pressure will be higher, eventually damaging the compressor motor. Condenser coils are located outdoors and can easily get dirty. Consider cleaning your outdoor coil or cleaning it professionally to ensure your air conditioning system operates correctly. Showing symptoms of a bad expansion valve The expansion valve is a critical part of the refrigeration cycle. Below we talk about the types of expansion valves and the symptoms of a bad expansion valve. There are three common types of expansion valves; fixed, thermal, and electronic. In the refrigeration cycle, the expansion valve acts as a metering device that reduces refrigerant pressure as it enters the evaporator coil. The reduction in pressure brings the refrigerant to a near-freezing temperature in the evaporator coil (think of the aerosol spray mentioned in the refrigerant problems section). The refrigeration cycle won't happen correctly with a faulty expansion valve. It can either let in too much refrigerant or not enough. A few symptoms to look for when the expansion valve lets too much refrigerant into the evaporator coil is that the air coming out of the AC is warmer or not as cold as it should be. This can eventually cause damage to the compressor. A few symptoms that the expansion valve is not letting enough refrigerant in is that the evaporator coil can be colder than it should be, causing it to freeze. An expansion valve could be faulty or show signs that it has gone bad if it was installed incorrectly or the system is charged with too much refrigerant, or in some cases, it may come defective from the factory. Faulty motors A typical air conditioning system has three motors, the blower wheel fan motor, the compressor motor, and the outdoor fan motor. If these motors fail, the air conditioning system won't work correctly. The compressor motor is used to compress the refrigerant and is a vital part of the refrigeration process. Without a compressor motor, there will be no cold air from the system. The blower wheel fan motor is the motor that forces the air through the system. If the blower wheel fan motor does not work, air will not flow through the system. The outdoor fan motor helps the refrigeration process. The HVAC system may still work if the outdoor fan motor is not working. However, the refrigeration process won't work effectively, which can cause the air flowing through the system to feel warm, can damage the compressor and will cause the system to consume more energy. Most HVAC system motors operate with the help of a capacitor. It is not uncommon that the motors are working fine; however, the capacitors have gone bad. A faulty AC capacitor should be ruled out before diagnosing a faulty AC motor. Often a faulty motor is caused by other underlying issues, such as refrigerant or ducting problems, a restricted indoor or outdoor coil, or even a dirty air filter. Signs and symptoms of a bad AC capacitor An air conditioning system has an electrical component called a capacitor. A capacitor gives the motors within the air conditioning system an extra boost when powering on. Below are some bad AC capacitor symptoms to look for. A capacitor works by storing energy, similar to a battery. However, it can release that energy in a burst rather than over time, like a battery. A faulty capacitor will prevent any motor that relies on it from working correctly. Capacitors can go bad over time due to heat. However, other underlying issues, such as restricted outdoor (condenser) coils or refrigerant problems, can strain the motors causing the capacitor to go bad sooner. We go in-depth about AC capacitors in this guide. However, one of the telltale signs of a bad capacitor is a loud humming noise from the system while on or during start-up or if the system appears to be on, but no cold air is coming from the vents. Connect with an HVAC professional if you think you have a faulty air conditioner capacitor. Air conditioning capacitors require expertise. Every capacitor has a microfarad rating that must match the HVAC system's requirements. Plus, you should determine the underlying issue as to why the capacitor failed in the first place. **Air conditioning capacitors store HIGH VOLTAGE and should always be handled by a professional. Electronic problems Every air conditioning system works with electronics. Some types of air conditioning systems have more complex electronics, and some have fewer. The electronics connect and allow communication between three main components of the air conditioning system; the outdoor unit (condenser), the air handling unit (air handler or furnace), and the thermostat. An electronic problem can be bad wiring, control board failures, faulty transformers, faulty AC capacitors, or a faulty motor. If the problem is with the field wiring, an HVAC pro can most likely fix the problem on the spot. However, other times, wiring built into a component of the air conditioning with a wiring harness is faulty. In that case, the HVAC professional must order wiring that is specific to the HVAC system. In the event of a control board problem, it can take a few weeks to fix. AC systems can have a few different control boards specific to the type of system, which needs to be diagnosed and ordered by an HVAC pro. A transformer is an electronic component that ensures parts of the air conditioning system receive the correct voltage. Typically in air conditioning systems, transformers convert 120 volts to 24 volts. A faulty transformer must be diagnosed and replaced by an HVAC pro and is usually done on the same day. Connect with an HVAC pro if you suspect you have an electrical problem with your air conditioning system. Consider completing yearly HVAC maintenance on your system to help prevent electrical problems when you need your AC the most. **Air conditioning systems use high voltage. Always connect with an HVAC pro for electrical problems** Drainage problems As an air conditioning system works, it creates condensation. This moisture build-up is normal. The problem is when the moisture doesn't drain properly. Water that gets built up should make its way to the drain line and out of the home. The drain can often get clogged by dust, dirt, debris, or even insects or spiders that lay eggs or create nests. When that happens, water gets backed up and can eventually flood, causing the air conditioning system to leak visually. When a "Safe-T" switch is in place, a clogged AC drain line will trigger the switch, which depending on how it's wired, will shut off power to the AC system and thermostat to prevent further flooding and damage. Learn more about preventing and unclogging an AC drain line. Or connect with an HVAC pro to get it done for you. Air conditioner safety switches Many newer air conditioning systems have safety switches installed to prevent damage to the HVAC system's components. Additionally, many systems have a "Safe-T" switch that is field installed to avoid water damage in the home in the event of a clogged drain line. In many cases, the AC safety switch keeps filling with water which can indicate a clogged drain line. Each manufacturer designs the safety switches differently, but the purpose is to prevent damage to the HVAC system. The various HVAC safety switches typically monitor the refrigerant's pressure, temperature, or both to avoid liquid refrigerants entering and damaging the compressor. You should connect with an HVAC pro if your air conditioning system isn't working because of a safety switch. The HVAC safety switches will trigger because of refrigerant problems, expansion valve problems, drainage problems, ducting problems, or a restricted indoor or outdoor coil. Ducting problems It may be hard to believe, but ducting is the root cause of many problems in most HVAC systems. It is one of the few things that isn't mechanical but causes most air conditioning problems. That is because the ducting is unique for each home and is usually designed by the HVAC professional installing the system. Every air conditioning system has specifications that determine how much airflow is required for the system to work properly and how much restriction or static pressure the system can handle to operate correctly. If the ducting is undersized, it can cause airflow restriction problems and high static pressure. Which can cause the system to freeze, damage motors, cause refrigeration cycle issues, and causes the system to run less efficiently. If the ducting is oversized, it may feel like little to no air is coming out of the supply registers (vents), and air won't flow around the home correctly. In addition to improper duct sizing, ducts can get disconnected or damaged in the attic or within the walls. This can cause leaks in either the supply (conditioned air) or the system's return (unconditioned air) side. If the leak is on the supply side, then conditioned air will flow into the walls or attic. And if the leak is on the return side, then the air will not circulate properly throughout the home and will suck in filthy air from the attic or other unconditioned spaces. A static pressure test and visual inspection need to be done to determine if there are ducting issues. A static pressure test involves drilling a few holes and inserting pressure probes to measure the pressure along different points in the system. You can connect with an HVAC pro for a static pressure test or learn more about Air Design if you are looking to redo the ductwork of your air conditioning system. Oversized or Undersized AC System Every air conditioning system needs to be sized to match the heat load requirement for the home. The heat load is determined by the cubic area of the space and other factors, such as the number of windows and insulation. Below we will explain what happens if the AC unit is over or undersized if it is better to oversize or undersize the AC system, and how to help an undersized unit. When the system is undersized, it will run continuously, trying to cool the home to the set temperature on the thermostat. And when the system is oversized, then it will reach the set temperature too soon, causing the system to cycle on and off frequently. Additionally, oversized systems also fail to remove humidity effectively because they shut off too often. All in all, both are not ideal. When in doubt, it is better to oversize a system. That is because the system needs to be able to cool the home adequately. If you have an undersized system, you can help the system by reducing the heat load. This can be done by improving insulation, upgrading windows and doors, and reducing outdoor air leakage around the home. In the case of an oversized system, it is possible to add a ventilation system, which brings in unconditioned air from the outdoors. This will help improve indoor air quality and increase the system's heat load, allowing the HVAC system to cycle correctly. If you are considering replacing your HVAC system, check out the Air Guide. We provide in-depth insights about air conditioning systems and the top things to consider when buying a new HVAC system. Conclusion There are endless reasons why an air conditioning system won't work, and it can be frustrating when it happens to you. In this guide, we covered the many reasons the AC system won’t work properly or turn on. We went over the signs to look out for to prevent a forthcoming air conditioning failure, such as signs of water, a noisy system, draft winds, warm air flow, frequent system cycling, and thermostat issues. Then, we dove deep into the most common causes to air conditioning system failures. Now, you should feel confident in knowing what signs to look for in a faulty air conditioning system and be knowledgeable when connecting with an HVAC pro if you need one. To prevent your AC from not turning on or causing issues in the future. And to ensure your air conditioning system works efficiently, it is best to maintain your AC system regularly. In the meantime, you can contact us or comment below if you have any questions.

  • An Updated HVAC Air Filters Guide with Most Popular Air Filter Types

    Every HVAC system has an air filter. Ensuring your HVAC air filter is clean is essential to ensure your HVAC system works efficiently, if at all. It can improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) of your home and helps reduce ownership costs through reduced energy bills and less frequent repairs and maintenance. Replacing your HVAC air filter is simple, and this guide will cover exactly how to change your HVAC filter, including questions such as how to know what size filter you need? What type of filter efficiency rating should you buy? And how often should you replace your filter? With a family history in HVAC of over 35 years, I can confidently say that regularly replacing your HVAC air filter is the simplest, most cost-effective way to maintain your HVAC system. Jump to a section: Why you should replace your HVAC filters regularly How often should replace HVAC filters How to know if the HVAC air filter is dirty? Where is the HVAC filter located Determining your HVAC filters size Types of air filters for HVAC (Metal, electrostatic, fiberglass, pleated, charcoal, washable, carbon, HEPA) Choosing a filter efficiency rating (MERV vs. FPR vs. MPR) How to change an HVAC filter located near the blower wheel How to change an HVAC filter located at the grille (vent) Conclusion Why you should replace your HVAC filters regularly Replacing air filters leads to better indoor air quality It's easy to forget to change your air filters. You can pop them in and let them do their job. However, leaving your air filters in too long will taint your home's air quality. The air circulating in the house contains pollutants, such as gases, chemicals, and other particles. As your HVAC system works, these particles restrict the airflow, reducing the air filter's effectiveness. Poor air quality can aggravate symptoms of severe respiratory or skin allergies. Dust, dirt, mold, and other allergens can irritate the eyes and cause fatigue. Prolonged exposure to poor air quality can lead to other long-term health complications. Regularly changing your air filters will improve the performance of your system and will effectively remove more harmful particles from the air in your home, improving IAQ. Replacing air filters saves you money Leaving a dirty air filter in your HVAC system will raise your energy bill. As your HVAC system works, air passes through it. A dirty filter will restrict the airflow, causing your blower fan motor to work harder and consume more energy. Replacing your air filter more frequently will not only help your HVAC system run more efficiently and lower energy costs. It will also increase the longevity of your HVAC system and reduce repairs. A clean filter will reduce the strain on the blower fan motor, reducing the chances of motor failure and high static pressure problems. Replacing air filters is more sustainable Since clean filters allow air to flow more effectively through the HVAC system, the system will consume less energy and is more sustainable, especially on hot summer days when there is a lot of strain on the electricity grid. Additionally, replacing air filters as opposed to using washable filters is also better for the environment. Most people wash washable filters into a sink or lawn, which can contaminate the soil and water supply locally. Using disposable air filters is more sustainable and is better for your health. They filter out contaminants more effectively and cause less harm when disposed of properly. How often should you replace HVAC air filters Now that we know the importance of replacing air filters let's review how often you should do it. Generally, a filter should be replaced whenever it gets dirty and causes airflow restrictions. As a general rule of thumb, one-inch filters last about 2-3 months, and five-inch filters last between 6-12 months. However, this is a big generalization because how fast a filter gets dirty depends on how much air flows through it (for how long the fan is on) and the indoor air quality (how many particles the filter needs to catch). You can buy a new filter and barely run your system, and your filter will last longer, or you can run your fan all the time to improve IAQ through filtration, and your filter will have a shorter lifetime. Therefore we recommend checking your air filter monthly to determine when you should replace your air filter. Or you could invest in a smart thermostat that can notify you when to replace your filter based on how often your fan is on. What does a dirty air filter look like? An HVAC filter will become discolored as it removes particles from the air. However, often the conditions in the home make it appear that the filter is dirtier than it is because of smoke in the house from cooking, candles, or smoking. A new filter will be white, and over time it becomes gray. Below are a few images of filters that are dirty at different levels. The first is a clean, brand-new filter, the second and third filters are dirty and should be changed, and the fourth and fifth are highly restricted filters. Your filter should never resemble the fourth or fifth in any way. Significant restrictions cause issues such as blower wheel (fan) motor failures and high static pressure. Signs of a dirty air filter include a noisy system and improper heating or cooling. Where is the HVAC filter located The HVAC filter is located in one of two places: on the air handling unit (gas furnace or central air handling system) near the blower fan or on the return grille (vent) on the ceiling or wall. Start by looking for the return grille (vent). The return grille is the one that sucks the air into the HVAC system as opposed to blowing it out into your home. It should be easy to locate as it is typically much larger than the supply grilles (vents). To ensure a vent is a supply or return, you can turn on the HVAC system and feel if the air is sucked in or blown out. We are looking for the one that is sucking in. Once the return grille has been found, see if a filter is located at the entrance of the grille. It should be easily visible. Here is what it should look like when there is a filter at the return grille. And here is what it should look like when there is no filter at the return grille. If there is no filter at the return grille, then the filter is located near the blower wheel (fan) at the gas furnace or air handling unit. The air handling unit can be found in a closet in the home, the garage, an attic, a basement, or a crawlspace and may be harder to reach. If you are attempting to replace the filter yourself, you may need a ladder to reach the attic, and consider wearing old clothing as it may get soiled from dust, dirt, or insulation. If it's in a crawlspace or attic, it may be harder to reach, and you will need to get down and dirty to get the job done. In rare cases, there will be no filter if the previous owners did not have them in place. If that is the case, consider getting an HVAC system cleaning, as the dust, dirt, and debris build-up can negatively affect the system performance and indoor air quality. Determining your HVAC filters size When replacing the air filter, buy the same size filter as before. The HVAC filter size is determined when the HVAC system is installed or if any modifications are made to the ducting system. The HVAC pro determines the initial size to meet the system airflow requirements. If you are installing a new system, you may have a choice of how thick your filter is. The most common in residential HVAC systems are one-inch or five-inch thick filters. We always recommend opting for the five-inch filter. Yes, five-inch filters are more expensive. However, five-inch filters have a greater surface area for air to flow, allowing them to last longer, and improve system performance. If you are unsure what size filter you need when replacing an existing filter, you can check on the old filter itself. All filters are labeled with the size on the sides of them. If you cannot see the print clearly, you can measure the dimensions with a tape measure. There should be no r to change the filter size. Each filter sits in a housing that ensures no air flows around the filter. If you purchase a filter that is too small, air will be able to flow easily around the filter, and if the filter is too big, it won't fit in the housing. In rare cases, you may find a forced filter or one too small for the housing. If that is the case, you should contact an HVAC pro to determine the correct filter size. Types of Air Filters for HVAC There are many types of HVAC air filters available on the market. Usually, when you install a new system, how it is installed or the type of system you have determines what type of filtration you have. Sometimes, you can swap the filter type as long as it is compatible with the filter housing. If you are considering changing your HVAC systems filter type, consult with an HVAC professional. Below we will cover different air filter types and the pros and cons of each one. Washable, metal, and electrostatic HVAC air filters There are a few types of metal washable HVAC filters. The most common are basic or pre-filtration washable filters and electrostatic washable HVAC filters. The pre-filters trap large particles, removing them from the airflow and preventing large dust and debris from causing the internal components of an HVAC system to get dirty. And electrostatic filters use an electric charge to capture and attract smaller particles removing them from the airflow. Metal filters need to be washed frequently to be effective. The pre-filter isn't good at removing small particles from the airflow, and the electrostatic part of the filter reaches its full capacity fast. It is recommended to clean them at least once a month. We do not often recommend electrostatic or "metal washable" filters for two main reasons. The first is that most electrostatic filters produce a small amount of ozone, a known lung irritant. And second is because for them to be effective, they need to be cleaned often, which can be an inconvenience for many people, especially if the HVAC filter is located in a hard-to-reach place such as an attic or crawlspace. Fiberglass HVAC air filters Fiberglass filters are also a basic form of filtration for HVAC systems. They often come in very low MERV ratings and are mostly used to protect the internal components of the HVAC system from getting dirty. Fiberglass HVAC filters are not effective in improving indoor air quality. Fiberglass air filters are disposable and often have a lifespan of about 1 to 3 months, depending on the indoor air quality and how often the HVAC system is turned on. Although some companies produce fiberglass HVAC filters with electrostatic capabilities, they incorporate a metal grille between the fiberglass fibers and use a dedicated electronically charged return grille (vent). To electrostatically charge the filter. This is a step up from the traditional fiberglass filter; however, as stated above, some electrostatic filters produce a small level of ozone, so you need to be aware and be sure to ask your HVAC pro if the type they offer produces ozone or not. Pleated filters Pleated HVAC air filters are the most common filter type in HVAC systems. Pleated filters are the common ones that are folded into an accordion-looking pattern. Pleated filters are the filters that are rated in the MERV, FPR, and MPR rating systems. Pleated filters can be 1, 2, 4, or 5 inches thick. The one and 5-inch options are typically used in residential applications, and the 2 and 4-inch options are typically used in commercial applications. Because of the accordion shape, the greater the thickness of the filter, the more surface the filter has to trap particles, and the longer the filter's lifespan. The 1 and 2-inch pleated filters typically last about 2 to 4 months before needing to be replaced, and the 4 and 5-inch filters need to be replaced every 6 to 12 months. Pleated HVAC air filters using the MERV, FPR, and MPR rating systems are typically synthetic polyester. However, the material and methods used to construct the material can vary by manufacturer. We always recommend purchasing authentic manufacturer-approved filters. Most after-market filters are not constructed correctly, which can increase the static pressure of the HVAC system. Authentic filters can achieve the rated efficiency rating while still allowing good airflow in the HVAC system, which can help reduce static pressure problems. Activated carbon and charcoal HVAC air filters Activated carbon or charcoal is often added to pleated HVAC filters. The active carbon is very porous and can trap harmful pollutants such as VOCs and other gases. Activated carbon filters are good at removing bad odors from the home. Activated carbon become popularized by many of the small portable air purifiers on the market however the benefits of activated carbon filters can be maximized when used in a central HVAC system. Because a central HVAC system moves air throughout the home, the filter can be utilized more effectively. Choosing a filter efficiency rating (MERV vs. FPR vs. MPR) The three standard filter efficiency rating systems are MERV, FPR, and MPR. The MERV rating system is considered the most common and international standard. However, some companies have developed other methods to rate their filters. We can look at it in the same way as the metric system vs. the empirical approach—different number systems to calculate how efficient a filter is at filtering out air particles. MERV - Minimum efficiency reporting value The MERV rating system is considered the most popular rating system in the industry. MERV ratings range from 1-16, where one is the lowest, filtering out the least amount of particles, and 16 is the highest, filtering out the most. The MERV rating of a filter is determined by its ability to filter out particles sized between 0.3 and 10 microns. For reference, a strand of hair is about 70 microns. The MERV rating of a filter is calculated through a test that checks how efficiently it removes particles of different sizes. Larger particles between 3.0 to 10.0 microns, medium-sized particles between 1.0 to 3.0 microns, and small particles between 0.3 to 1.0 microns. Each rated filter needs to filter out a certain percentage of particles of various sizes. Below you can find a side-by-side comparison between MERV efficiency ratings based on particles of various sizes. A detailed list of particle sizes can be found here. MERV 8 - filters can filter out more than 70% of particles between 3.0-10.0 microns and more than 20% of the particles between 1.0-3.0 microns. MERV 10 - filters can filter out more than 80% of particles between 3.0-10.0 microns and more than 50% between 1.0-3.0 microns. MERV 11 - filters can filter out more than 85% of particles between 3.0-10.0 microns, more than 65% between 1.0-3.0 microns, and more than 20% between 0.3-1.0 microns. MERV 13 - filters can filter out more than 90% of particles between 3.0-10.0 microns, more than 85% between 1.0-3.0 microns, and more than 50% between 0.3-1.0 microns. MERV 16 - filters can filter out more than 95% of particles between 3.0-10.0 microns, more than 95% between 1.0-3.0 microns, and more than 95% between 0.3-1.0 microns. When considering what MERV rating to buy, remember that the higher the rating, the more effective it is at removing smaller particles. In many states, the minimum required MERV rating on new HVAC systems is MERV 13. FPR - Filter performance rating The FPR rating system, developed by Home Depot, again gives us the filter's efficiency rating. The FPR rating of a filter is calculated by the filter's ability to capture large and small particles and how much added weight the filter gains from the particle build-up through the filter lifetime. The FPR uses a weighted average to calculate the score, ranking on a scale of one to ten, with ten being the highest. Large particles have a 60% weight, small particles have a 30% weight, and the added weight to the filter is 10% in the total calculation. FPR filters come in four efficiency ratings, 4 - good, 7 - better, 9 - best, and 10 - premium. What you choose depends on how effective you want your filtration to be. FPR Rating 4 - filters out large particles like household dust and lint, dust mites, pollen, and pet dander. FPR Rating 7 - filters out everything in FPR 4, plus small particles like bacteria and mold spores. FPR Rating 9 - filters out everything in FPR 7, plus smoke, smog, microscopic allergens, and particles that can carry viruses. FPR Rating 10 - filters out everything in FPR 9, plus particles that can carry odors. MPR - Micro-particle performance rating The MPR rating system, developed by 3M, again gives us the filter's efficiency rating. 3M claims that this method is scientifically better; however, we'll leave that to you to decide. The MPR is calculated by measuring the effectiveness of a filter in capturing small particles ranging from .03 to 1.0 microns. This method assumes that if a filter can capture the small particles, it can also catch the large ones; this is partly true, as you can see in this video for a detailed explanation. Generally, .03 microns is considered the most penetrating particle size (MPPS), which is why they use that as a benchmark. You can read more here if you want to get scientific about it. Nonetheless, 3M doesn't explain how MPR is calculated in-depth. MPR ratings range from 300 - 2800, with 300 being the lowest efficiency filter and 2800 being the highest efficiency filter. You can see how 3M compares its filters to MERV ratings. However, the comparison is a bit lob-sided because it equates the highest efficiency MPR-rated filter to MERVs' third most efficient filter. HEPA - High-efficiency particulate air filter HEPA high-efficiency air filters are the highest-efficiency air filters you can get. HEPA filters filter out at least 99.7% of dust, pollen, mold, bacteria, and any airborne particles with a size of 0.3 microns. HEPA filters are more expensive and are typically found in hospitals, delicate manufacturing plants, and airplanes. Many health-conscious individuals opt for a HEPA filter in their homes, and you can purchase a portable room HEPA filtration system online. However, we believe a whole-home solution is more thorough. You can contact an HVAC pro if you are interested in a whole-home HEPA filtration solution. How to change an HVAC filter How to change an HVAC filter located near the blower wheel The main steps to changing a filter located near the blower wheel are: Located the filter Cut the power to the system Open the filter housing Remove the old filter Replace with the new clean filter Restore the power Below we go in-depth and walk you step by step through how to replace the filter located at the blower wheel. Once you have determined that the air filter is located near the blower wheel (fan) at the gas furnace or air handling unit, follow these steps to replace the air filter. First, turn off the HVAC system. The best way to do this is by unplugging the air handling unit from the power. This ensures the fan won't kick on by accident. Replacing the filter when the system is on is dangerous and can cause damage to the system. The blower wheel (fan) and motor are powerful when on and can cause the system to get dirty as it sucks in dust and debris and can even cause physical injury if touched when it is working. Next, open the filter housing or cabinet. Filters near the blower wheel (fan) can be either one or five-inch. The one-inch housing typically has one or two little screws that can be opened by hand. And the five-inch filters are typically in a cabinet that is popped into place and can be opened by hand. Removing the old filter from the cabinet or housing should be easy. The filter slides out. Sometimes a little extra force is needed if the filter is sitting snug in place. Before removing the filter, notice if you see an arrow printed on the filter. This arrow indicates the direction of airflow. Now is a good time to document the size of the old filter if a new filter needs to be purchased. Before putting in the new filter, it is a good idea to write the filter change date with a sharpie or document it on the phone. You can also set a reminder to check the filter's cleanliness and decide when it needs to be replaced. Noting the filter change date is also crucial if there are any future problems with the HVAC system; a technician will need to know when the filter has been changed. After documenting the replacement date, it is simple to slide the filter into the cabinet and securely close it. Just be sure that the arrow is pointing in the correct direction. The arrow lets us know what direction air is supposed to flow through the filter. Remember that air flows towards the blower wheel (fan) and motor when inserting the filter. So the arrow should be pointing toward the blower wheel (fan). Now turn the HVAC system back on. You'll be surprised how many people forget this step and don't know why the HVAC system isn't working. How to change an HVAC filter located at the grille (vent) The main steps to changing a filter located at the return grille (vent): Located the filter Cut the power to the system Open the filter housing Remove the old filter Replace with the new clean filter Restore the power Below we go in-depth and walk you step by step through how to replace the filter located at the return grille. Once you have determined that the air filter is located at the return grille, follow these steps to replace the air filter. First, cut the power to the HVAC system. Turning off the system can be done by disconnecting the air handling unit from the power, shutting down the electrical breaker, or turning off the power from the thermostat. If turning off power to the thermostat, ensure that all modes are off, including heating, cooling, and fan. Replacing a filter when the system is on can cause dust, dirt, or debris to enter the system and cause physical injury. Once the power is off, open the grille housing. Usually, two to four levers allow you to open the grille and access the filter. The filter should be easily removable. Now is a good time to note the filter size if a new filter needs to be purchased. Before replacing the filter, it is a good idea to note the filter replacement date either on the side of the filter or on the phone. You can also set a reminder to check the filter's cleanliness and decide when it needs to be replaced. Documenting the filter change date is also crucial if there are any future problems with the HVAC system; a technician will need to know when the filter has been changed. After noting the replacement date, it is simple to insert the filter into the grille housing and securely fasten it in place. Just be sure that the arrow is pointing in the correct direction. The arrow lets us know what direction air is supposed to flow through the filter. Remember that air flows towards the HVAC system. So the arrow should be pointing inwards toward the wall or ceiling. Now turn the HVAC system back on. Conclusion Who would have thought that something as simple as a filter dramatically impacts the performance of your HVAC system and indoor air quality? We covered a lot of topics, such as the importance of a clean air filter and how it improves air quality, saves you money, and is more sustainable. We discussed how often to replace an HVAC air filter and how to tell if yours is dirty. We discussed what filter you should buy, including sizes and choosing a filter efficiency rating, and we walked you through how to replace an air filter. By now, you should feel confident that you know when and how to replace your air filter and what filter to buy when the time comes. Changing your air filter is a simple task to incorporate into your home maintenance routine. It's one of the simplest ways to preserve your health and HVAC system and reduce energy costs simultaneously. Consider buying a smart thermostat if you want a more accurate filter change reminder. A smart thermostat can monitor how long your fan runs to notify you when it is time to replace your filter. And if you want more comprehensive maintenance for your HVAC system, consider HVAC system cleaning or yearly HVAC system maintenance. You can contact us or comment below if you have any questions.

  • The Essential Guide to HVAC Capacitors - Everything you should know

    If the air conditioner isn’t working (or the heat pump), it may be because the capacitor is defective. An AC capacitor is an essential part of an HVAC system that often goes bad over time, and our best guess is that if you are reading this guide, something has gone wrong with your AC capacitor. This guide covers everything you need to know about an AC capacitor, including what it is and how it works, how to identify the signs of a faulty AC capacitor, what happens if a capacitor fails, how much it costs to replace one, determining what capacitor to buy, how long they last, what causes them to fail, and how they are checked. We explain all of this in an easy-to-understand way, answering all your questions about AC capacitors. Jump to Section What is an AC capacitor? What does an AC capacitor do Signs of a bad AC capacitor What happens when an AC capacitor fails Cost to replace AC capacitor Who makes the best AC capacitors How long does an AC capacitor last What causes an AC capacitor to fail How to check if an AC capacitor is bad Conclusion What is an AC capacitor? An AC capacitor is an electrical component within an HVAC system. It gives any motors an extra electricity boost to start and operate correctly. Depending on the HVAC motors, it may have a few capacitors. Most HVAC systems will have one on the inducer motor, another on the blower fan motor, and one combined capacitor or two separate ones for the compressor motor and condenser fan motor. Higher-end HVAC systems with variable speed motors usually have capacitors built into the control board and cannot be replaced. In these cases, the control board will need to be replaced. What does an AC capacitor do To describe how an AC unit capacitor works and what it does, we will compare it to a battery. A capacitor and a battery both store electricity. A capacitor can release all the electricity in seconds, whereas a battery will release its energy over time. This fast release of energy helps the motors meet the energy demand it needs when starting up. In HVAC and AC units, the motors require that extra electricity when starting up. A capacitor gives that extra electricity and then recharges and is ready to provide that boost of electricity when it is needed again. Depending on the type of HVAC system, they may have an AC start capacitor, AC run capacitor, or an AC dual capacitor. This guide covers capacitors as a whole. Because of how a capacitor works and what it is designed to do, they often become defective and must be replaced. Below we will cover some of the signs of a faulty capacitor. Signs of a bad AC Capacitor There are various signs to look for that may indicate a faulty capacitor. These signs include noise indications, visual indications, and sensory indications. The first is a sensory indication. If when turning on the AC, it blows warm ambient air. It can indicate that the compressor's AC capacitor is not working. The compressor is a critical component of the refrigeration cycle. If the compressor isn’t working because the AC capacitor is defective, the HVAC system will not be able to cool the air. Another sensory indication to look out for is when the HVAC system is turned on, and no air is flowing through the registers (vents), indicating that the blower wheel capacitor is defective. When the blower wheel capacitor is defective, the blower motor will not be able to start correctly, preventing air from flowing through the system and into the home. One visual indication is that the outdoor condenser fan is not working when the AC is turned on. When the outdoor condenser fan isn’t working when the AC is on, there is a good chance the capacitor is defective. However, in higher-end HVAC systems that can operate at variable capacities, the outdoor fan motor may not work by design due to how they function. Another way to visually identify a bad capacitor is because of an oily-like fluid built into the capacitor (similar to a battery). Often, if the oily-like fluid leaks, it allows dust and debris to stick and build up on or around the capacitor and electrical housing of the HVAC system. However, it may be hard to see this as it often requires opening up the electrical housing of the system. Do not attempt to open the electrical housing yourself. HVAC systems use high voltage electricity. In some cases, the capacitor may still work but is on the edge of failing. This can be identified if, when turning on the HVAC system, there is a brief, loud winding up or humming noise when the HVAC system starts. We always recommend connecting with an HVAC pro before jumping to conclusions. Often, underlying conditions can cause the AC capacitor to go bad sooner than it should. And in other cases, you may have a functioning capacitor, but your HVAC system may not work for different reasons. An HVAC professional will test the electrical capacitance of the capacitor and determine whether it is still good. If you are concerned that the HVAC system will stop working because of a faulty capacitor, the best way to ensure the HVAC system operates all year round is to have yearly maintenance on your heating and cooling systems. What happens when an AC capacitor fails When an HVAC capacitor fails, a few things can happen to the HVAC system. If the outdoor unit (condensor) capacitor fails, either the compressor won’t start at all, or the compressor will start but the outdoor fan will not work. In both cases the capacitor should be replaced. Although the system will provide cool air when the outdoor fan is not working, the refrigeration cycle will not happen properly or efficiently which can cause more damage to the HVAC system and compressor over time. If the indoor blower fan motors capacitor fails, the blower motor will not turn on, preventing air from flowing through the HVAC system and throughout the home. Cost to replace AC capacitor An AC capacitor itself is not too expensive. The more costly part of replacing a capacitor is the labor due to the knowledge and danger involved in replacing one. The time to diagnose and replace an AC capacitor can be 15-30 minutes of work. The cost for the AC capacitor can be between $6 to $30+ online or in-store, and the labor cost to replace an AC capacitor can be anywhere from $150 and upwards of $350. The cost of replacing an AC capacitor is between $150 and $380, labor and materials included. Replacing a capacitor the wrong way can damage the new capacitor and the motors and, in worse cases, cause injury or death. We recommend connecting with an HVAC pro to replace an AC capacitor. An HVAC pro knows how to diagnose a faulty capacitor and has the experience and knowledge to replace one. If you purchase an ac capacitor online or in-store, buy the correct microfarad rating required for the HVAC system's motors. Who makes the best ac capacitors Like any product, there are more expensive and less expensive variations. The same applies to AC capacitors. A less expensive option may work but will probably fail faster, whereas a more expensive one is better engineered and uses higher quality materials that help them last longer. The choice is yours whether you want to invest in a better quality AC capacitor. However, it is essential that the capacitor meets the requirements of the motor. A capacitor is measured by its microfarad rating, which measures how much energy it can store. The higher the rating, the more energy the capacitor can store. Each motor is unique, and the capacitor needs to meet the energy requirements of the motor. In most cases, it is possible to match the microfarad rating of the new capacitor with the old one. However, oftentimes, we are unable to be sure that the old capacitor is the correct one, either because the previous owners or an inexperienced HVAC technician may have replaced it with the wrong one. To properly match the capacitor, the motor and specifications need to be checked. We always recommend connecting with an HVAC pro in case of a faulty AC capacitor. How long does an ac capacitor last Under ideal conditions, an AC capacitor should last upwards of 10-15 years. However, how long an AC capacitor lasts on an AC is depends on the operating conditions of the HVAC system. It is rare that an HVAC system operates in ideal conditions. Below we will discuss the various reasons an AC capacitor will fail sooner. What causes an AC capacitor to fail An AC capacitor will fail sooner the more strain it has on it. And since HVAC systems are designed to work under ideal conditions any variation from these ideal conditions can cause the capacitor to fail sooner. In order for an HVAC system to work in ideal conditions, it needs to be properly designed and installed. When an HVAC system isn’t designed properly it can cause the system to work under high pressures, which will put more strain on the capacitor while running and during start up. High pressures can result from improper refrigeration levels, but more often than not is a result of high static pressure either from poor HVAC system design or dirty air filters. In addition to high pressures putting strain on the capacitor, poor insulation and high infiltration rates will cause the system to cycle on and off more frequently, causing it to wear and break down sooner. How to check if an ac capacitor is bad An AC capacitor is checked with the help of a multimeter and the terminals that the wires connect to. A multimeter is a device that is able to read electrical ratings. AC capacitors are measured in microfarads. There are a few ways to check the if the capacitor is still good. One method is when the system is on and the other is when the system is off and the capacitor is isolated from the system. Which method is better is a topic of debate between HVAC pros. Either way a capacitor should be checked by a professional because even when they are isolated they contain a high level of electrical charge. When checking an isolated capacitor, the multimeter should be set to the microfarad reading. Next the capacitor should be checked between the C (common) terminal and the other terminals. Depending on the capacitor it may have a few terminals. The reading between the C (common) terminal and the other terminal is the microfarad rating. When checking a capacitor if the system is running, there is a formula that involves testing the amperage going to the motor, multiplying that by 2,652, and dividing it by the voltage reading of the C (common) and the other terminal that is being checked. The formula is (AMPS / 2,652) x Voltage = Microfarad rating Each capacitor has the microfarad rating stated on the side of it that indicates a properly functioning capacitor. Most capacitors can operate within 5-10%+- of the indicated microfarad rating. If the AC capacitor is checked and tested and falls outside of that 5-10% range, it should be replaced. Conclusion An AC capacitor is a critical component of an HVAC system. It provides the additional electricity needed to start and run the motors of an HVAC system. Now that you know what an ac capacitor is, what it does, the signs to look for to identify a bad ac capacitor, what happens if an AC capacitor is bad, what kind and how much it costs to replace one, what causes them to fail, and how long they last. You can confidently approach HVAC pros if you think you have a faulty capacitor. If your air conditioner isn’t working, there could be other problems asides from a faulty capacitor. We recommend connecting with an HVAC pro to diagnose and fix a faulty AC capacitor. If you are considering upgrading your existing or purchasing a new HVAC system, check out Air Guide or Air Design to learn about the various types of HVAC systems and the importance of a well designed one. Then we can connect you with a vetted Air Pro to complete your HVAC project.

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  • Accessibility statement | Dekkoi

    Accessibility statement Effective date: March 4, 2022 Accessibility Statement for Dekkoi ​ This is an accessibility statement from Dekkoi, Corp. Measures to support accessibility Dekkoi, Corp. takes the following measures to ensure the accessibility of Dekkoi: Include accessibility throughout our internal policies. Conformance status The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) define requirements for designers and developers to improve accessibility for people with disabilities. It defines three levels of conformance: Level A, Level AA, and Level AAA. Dekko is partially conformant with WCAG 2.0 level AA. Partially conformant means that some parts of the content do not fully conform to the accessibility standard. Feedback We welcome your feedback on the accessibility of Dekkoi. Please let us know if you encounter accessibility barriers on Dekkoi: E-mail: contact@dekkoi.co Limitations and alternatives Despite our best efforts to ensure accessibility of Dekkoi , there may be some limitations. Below is a description of known limitations, and potential solutions. Please contact us if you observe an issue not listed below. Known limitations for Dekkoi: ​ Limited audio or video content : Some of our blog content has audio versions. We do not have an audio version of all of the content on our site because of Limited resources. We are continuously updating our content with a goal to reach accessibility standards. Report an issue or contact us for help. Assessment approach Dekkoi, Corp. assessed the accessibility of Dekkoi by the following approaches: Self-evaluation

  • Cookie policy | Dekkoi

    Cookie policy Effective date: January 9, 2022 Cookie policy This cookie policy (“Policy”) describes what cookies are and how and they're being used by the dekkoi.co website (“Website” or “Service”) and any of its related products and services (collectively, “Services”). This Policy is a legally binding agreement between you (“User”, “you” or “your”) and Dekkoi Corp. (doing business as “Dekkoi”, “we”, “us” or “our”). If you are entering into this agreement on behalf of a business or other legal entity, you represent that you have the authority to bind such entity to this agreement, in which case the terms “User”, “you” or “your” shall refer to such entity. If you do not have such authority, or if you do not agree with the terms of this agreement, you must not accept this agreement and may not access and use the Website and Services. You should read this Policy so you can understand the types of cookies we use, the information we collect using cookies and how that information is used. It also describes the choices available to you regarding accepting or declining the use of cookies. For further information on how we use, store and keep your personal data secure, see our privacy policy. What are cookies? Cookies are small pieces of data stored in text files that are saved on your computer or other devices when websites are loaded in a browser. They are widely used to remember you and your preferences, either for a single visit (through a "session cookie") or for multiple repeat visits (using a "persistent cookie"). Session cookies are temporary cookies that are used during the course of your visit to the Website, and they expire when you close the web browser. Persistent cookies are used to remember your preferences within our Website and remain on your desktop or mobile device even after you close your browser or restart your computer. They ensure a consistent and efficient experience for you while visiting the Website and Services. Cookies may be set by the Website ("first-party cookies"), or by third parties, such as those who serve content or provide advertising or analytics services on the Website ("third party cookies"). These third parties can recognize you when you visit our website and also when you visit certain other websites. You may learn more about cookies and how they work in this guide. What type of cookies do we use? - Necessary cookies Necessary cookies allow us to offer you the best possible experience when accessing and navigating through our Website and using its features. For example, these cookies let us recognize that you have created an account and have logged into that account to access the content. - Analytical cookies These cookies enable us and third party services to collect aggregated data for statistical purposes on how our visitors use the Website. These cookies do not contain personal information such as names and email addresses and are used to help us improve your user experience of the Website. - Advertising cookies Advertising cookies allow us and third parties serve relevant ads to you more effectively and help us collect aggregated audit data, research, and performance reporting for advertisers. They also enable us to understand and improve the delivery of ads to you and know when certain ads have been shown to you. Your web browser may request advertisements directly from ad network servers, these networks can view, edit, or set their own cookies, just as if you had requested a web page from their website. Although we do not use cookies to create a profile of your browsing behavior on third party websites, we do use aggregate data from third parties to show you relevant, interest-based advertising. We do not provide any personal information that we collect to advertisers. - Social media cookies Third party cookies from social media sites (such as Facebook, Twitter, etc) let us track social network users when they visit or use the Website and Services, or share content, by using a tagging mechanism provided by those social networks. These cookies are also used for event tracking and remarketing purposes. Any data collected with these tags will be used in accordance with our and social networks’ privacy policies. We will not collect or share any personally identifiable information from the user. Do we use web beacons or tracking pixels? Our emails may contain a "web beacon" (or "tracking pixel") to tell us whether our emails are opened and verify any clicks through to links or advertisements within the email. We may use this information for purposes including determining which of our emails are more interesting to users and to query whether users who do not open our emails wish to continue receiving them. The pixel will be deleted when you delete the email. If you do not wish the pixel to be downloaded to your device, you should read the email in plain text view or with images disabled. What are your cookie options? If you don’t like the idea of cookies or certain types of cookies, you can change your browser’s settings to delete cookies that have already been set and to not accept new cookies. Visit internetcookies.com to learn more about how to do this. Changes and amendments We reserve the right to modify this Policy or its terms related to the Website and Services at any time at our discretion. When we do, we will revise the updated date at the bottom of this page. We may also provide notice to you in other ways at our discretion, such as through the contact information you have provided. An updated version of this Policy will be effective immediately upon the posting of the revised Policy unless otherwise specified. Your continued use of the Website and Services after the effective date of the revised Policy (or such other act specified at that time) will constitute your consent to those changes. Acceptance of this policy You acknowledge that you have read this Policy and agree to all its terms and conditions. By accessing and using the Website and Services you agree to be bound by this Policy. If you do not agree to abide by the terms of this Policy, you are not authorized to access or use the Website and Services. Contacting us If you have any questions, concerns, or complaints regarding this Policy or the use of cookies, we encourage you to contact us using the details below: policies@dekkoi.co This document was last updated on January 9, 2022

  • Terms of use | Dekkoi

    Terms of use Effective date: January 9, 2022 Terms and conditions These terms and conditions (“Agreement”) set forth the general terms and conditions of your use of the dekkoi.co website (“Website” or “Service”) and any of its related products and services (collectively, “Services”). This Agreement is legally binding between you (“User”, “you” or “your”) and Dekkoi Corp. (doing business as “Dekkoi”, “we”, “us” or “our”). If you are entering into this agreement on behalf of a business or other legal entity, you represent that you have the authority to bind such entity to this agreement, in which case the terms “User”, “you” or “your” shall refer to such entity. If you do not have such authority, or if you do not agree with the terms of this agreement, you must not accept this agreement and may not access and use the Website and Services. By accessing and using the Website and Services, you acknowledge that you have read, understood, and agree to be bound by the terms of this Agreement. You acknowledge that this Agreement is a contract between you and Dekkoi, even though it is electronic and is not physically signed by you, and it governs your use of the Website and Services. Links to other resources Although the Website and Services may link to other resources (such as websites, mobile applications, etc.), we are not, directly or indirectly, implying any approval, association, sponsorship, endorsement, or affiliation with any linked resource, unless specifically stated herein. Some of the links on the Website may be “affiliate links”. This means if you click on the link and purchase an item, Dekkoi will receive an affiliate commission. We are not responsible for examining or evaluating, and we do not warrant the offerings of, any businesses or individuals or the content of their resources. We do not assume any responsibility or liability for the actions, products, services, and content of any other third parties. You should carefully review the legal statements and other conditions of use of any resource which you access through a link on the Website. Your linking to any other off-site resources is at your own risk. Prohibited uses In addition to other terms as set forth in the Agreement, you are prohibited from using the Website and Services or Content: (a) for any unlawful purpose; (b) to solicit others to perform or participate in any unlawful acts; (c) to violate any international, federal, provincial or state regulations, rules, laws, or local ordinances; (d) to infringe upon or violate our intellectual property rights or the intellectual property rights of others; (e) to harass, abuse, insult, harm, defame, slander, disparage, intimidate, or discriminate based on gender, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, race, age, national origin, or disability; (f) to submit false or misleading information; (g) to upload or transmit viruses or any other type of malicious code that will or may be used in any way that will affect the functionality or operation of the Website and Services, third party products and services, or the Internet; (h) to spam, phish, pharm, pretext, spider, crawl, or scrape; (i) for any obscene or immoral purpose; or (j) to interfere with or circumvent the security features of the Website and Services, third party products and services, or the Internet. We reserve the right to terminate your use of the Website and Services for violating any of the prohibited uses. Intellectual property rights “Intellectual Property Rights” means all present and future rights conferred by statute, common law or equity in or in relation to any copyright and related rights, trademarks, designs, patents, inventions, goodwill and the right to sue for passing off, rights to inventions, rights to use, and all other intellectual property rights, in each case whether registered or unregistered and including all applications and rights to apply for and be granted, rights to claim priority from, such rights and all similar or equivalent rights or forms of protection and any other results of intellectual activity which subsist or will subsist now or in the future in any part of the world. This Agreement does not transfer to you any intellectual property owned by Dekkoi or third parties, and all rights, titles, and interests in and to such property will remain (as between the parties) solely with Dekkoi. All trademarks, service marks, graphics and logos used in connection with the Website and Services, are trademarks or registered trademarks of Dekkoi or its licensors. Other trademarks, service marks, graphics and logos used in connection with the Website and Services may be the trademarks of other third parties. Your use of the Website and Services grants you no right or license to reproduce or otherwise use any of Dekkoi or third party trademarks. Disclaimer of warranty You agree that such Service is provided on an “as is” and “as available” basis and that your use of the Website and Services is solely at your own risk. We expressly disclaim all warranties of any kind, whether express or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose and non-infringement. We make no warranty that the Services will meet your requirements, or that the Service will be uninterrupted, timely, secure, or error-free; nor do we make any warranty as to the results that may be obtained from the use of the Service or as to the accuracy or reliability of any information obtained through the Service or that defects in the Service will be corrected. You understand and agree that any material and/or data downloaded or otherwise obtained through the use of Service is done at your own discretion and risk and that you will be solely responsible for any damage or loss of data that results from the download of such material and/or data. We make no warranty regarding any goods or services purchased or obtained through the Service or any transactions entered into through the Service unless stated otherwise. No advice or information, whether oral or written, obtained by you from us or through the Service shall create any warranty not expressly made herein. Limitation of liability To the fullest extent permitted by applicable law, in no event will Dekkoi, its affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, suppliers or licensors be liable to any person for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, cover or consequential damages (including, without limitation, damages for lost profits, revenue, sales, goodwill, use of content, impact on business, business interruption, loss of anticipated savings, loss of business opportunity) however caused, under any theory of liability, including, without limitation, contract, tort, warranty, breach of statutory duty, negligence or otherwise, even if the liable party has been advised as to the possibility of such damages or could have foreseen such damages. To the maximum extent permitted by applicable law, the aggregate liability of Dekkoi and its affiliates, officers, employees, agents, suppliers and licensors relating to the services will be limited to an amount no greater than one dollar or any amounts actually paid in cash by you to Dekkoi for the prior one month period prior to the first event or occurrence giving rise to such liability. The limitations and exclusions also apply if this remedy does not fully compensate you for any losses or fails of its essential purpose. Indemnification You agree to indemnify and hold Dekkoi and its affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, suppliers and licensors harmless from and against any liabilities, losses, damages or costs, including reasonable attorneys’ fees, incurred in connection with or arising from any third party allegations, claims, actions, disputes, or demands asserted against any of them as a result of or relating to your Content, your use of the Website and Services or any willful misconduct on your part. Severability All rights and restrictions contained in this Agreement may be exercised and shall be applicable and binding only to the extent that they do not violate any applicable laws and are intended to be limited to the extent necessary so that they will not render this Agreement illegal, invalid or unenforceable. If any provision or portion of any provision of this Agreement shall be held to be illegal, invalid or unenforceable by a court of competent jurisdiction, it is the intention of the parties that the remaining provisions or portions thereof shall constitute their agreement with respect to the subject matter hereof, and all such remaining provisions or portions thereof shall remain in full force and effect. Dispute resolution The formation, interpretation, and performance of this Agreement and any disputes arising out of it shall be governed by the substantive and procedural laws of California, United States without regard to its rules on conflicts or choice of law and, to the extent applicable, the laws of United States. The exclusive jurisdiction and venue for actions related to the subject matter hereof shall be the courts located in California, United States, and you hereby submit to the personal jurisdiction of such courts. You hereby waive any right to a jury trial in any proceeding arising out of or related to this Agreement. The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods does not apply to this Agreement. Assignment You may not assign, resell, sub-license or otherwise transfer or delegate any of your rights or obligations hereunder, in whole or in part, without our prior written consent, which consent shall be at our own sole discretion and without obligation; any such assignment or transfer shall be null and void. We are free to assign any of its rights or obligations hereunder, in whole or in part, to any third party as part of the sale of all or substantially all of its assets or stock or as part of a merger. Changes and amendments We reserve the right to modify this Agreement or its terms related to the Website and Services at any time at our discretion. When we do, we will revise the updated date at the bottom of this page. We may also provide notice to you in other ways at our discretion, such as through the contact information you have provided. An updated version of this Agreement will be effective immediately upon the posting of the revised Agreement unless otherwise specified. Your continued use of the Website and Services after the effective date of the revised Agreement (or such other act specified at that time) will constitute your consent to those changes. Acceptance of these terms You acknowledge that you have read this Agreement and agree to all its terms and conditions. By accessing and using the Website and Services you agree to be bound by this Agreement. If you do not agree to abide by the terms of this Agreement, you are not authorized to access or use the Website and Services. Contacting us If you have any questions, concerns, or complaints regarding this Agreement, we encourage you to contact us using the details below: policies@dekkoi.co This document was last updated on January 9, 2022

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